As noted above, the main purpose of an EEA is to license an application to an end-user. For this reason, all end-user licensing agreements should have a section expressly stating that a license is granted. Many companies have parodied this belief that users do not read end-user licensing agreements by adding unusual clauses, knowing that few users will ever read them. As an April joke, Gamestation added a clause stating that users who placed an order on April 1, 2010 agreed to give their souls irrevocably to the company, which was accepted by 7,500 users. Although there is a box to be contributed to exclude the “immortal soul” clause, few users have verified it, and Gamestation has concluded that 88% of its users have not read the agreement. [17] The PC Pitstop program contained a clause in its end-user license agreement that stipulated that anyone who read the clause and contacted the company would receive a financial reward, but it took four months and more than 3,000 software downloads before someone collected them. [18] During the installation of version 4 of the Advanced Reading Tool, the installer measured the time elapsed between the appearance and acceptance of end-user licensing agreements to calculate the average playback speed. While the agreements were accepted fairly quickly, a dialog box “congratulated” users for their ridiculously high reading speed of several hundred words per second. [19] South Park parodied in the HumancentiPad episode, in which Kyle had not read the terms of use of his latest iTunes update, and therefore accidentally agreed to let Apple employees act on him. [20] Yes, something. Terms of use (also known as terms of use and terms of use) generally govern the relationship between a company, its services and its users/consumers – this broad scope can encompass everything from copyright and licensing to consumer rights, restitution rules and the definition of applicable law. EULA operates in the same way, but focuses mainly on the licensing relationship.

Terms, terms, terms of use and LESUM mean the same thing in terms of software and applications and are often used interchangeably. The applicability of an AEA depends on several factors, one of which is the court where the case is being tried. Some courts that have considered the validity of Shrinkwrap licensing agreements have invalidated some EULAs and characterized them as unacceptable liability contracts under the U.C.C . see z.B. Step-Saver Data Systems, Inc. v. Wyse Technology,[6] Vault Corp.